Summary of the essay shooting an elephant

Suddenly, one night an elephant owned by an Indian man broke its chain and escaped. The next day Orwell was called to handle the situation, He was told many different stories about the elephant by people which he did not believe, until he found a trampled body in the mud. After that, he began to feel uncomfortable and pressured by the crowd to shoot the elephant once he found him.

Summary of the essay shooting an elephant

Plot overview and analysis written by an experienced literary critic. Full study guide for this title currently under development. To be notified when we launch a full study guide, please contact us. Shooting an Elephant Summary SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides that feature detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, quotes, and essay topics.

Shooting an Elephant is a essay by British novelist and satirist George Orwell, first published in the anti-fascist literary magazine New Writing and later broadcast by the BBC Home Service in Taking place during the British occupation of Burma, it focuses on an unnamed narrator, considered by many to be a stand-in for Orwell himself, as he is tasked to shoot an aggressive elephant while serving as a police officer in the country.

The essay is considered by many to be a metaphor for British imperialism, a subject Orwell wrote of critically in many of his nonfiction works. Orwell did spend significant time in Burma, and the extent to which Shooting an Elephant is based on actual events is unknown.

Burma was held as a British colony between at the conclusion of the third Anglo-Burmese War, and its independence in Orwell held the post of Assistant Superintendent in the British Indian Imperial Police from towhen the story takes place.

Although the narrator sympathizes with the Burmese, his official role makes him a symbol of the British occupation, and he is frequently harassed and jeered by the locals.

One day, he receives a call that a normally tame elephant is rampaging through a village. He heads off with a Winchester rifle and riding on a pony to track it down.

When he arrives at the village, he asks around and receives conflicting reports from the poverty-stricken locals.

Shooting An Elephant Summary - words | Study Guides and Book Summaries

He thinks the incident may have been a hoax, but soon finds a man who has been trampled by the elephant. He sends an order for an elephant rifle and is followed by thousands of people as he tracks the elephant to a rice paddy where it is resting.

Summary of the essay shooting an elephant

The narrator starts to have second thoughts, regretting that he has to kill the elephant now that it is resting peacefully. However, the crowd wants to see blood and is chanting for the narrator to take the shot.

However, the people continue to pressure, and eventually he takes the shot. Several additional shots also fail to finish off the beast, and eventually the narrator breaks down and leaves the scene, unable to watch as the elephant dies slowly of its wounds.

He later finds out that as soon as the elephant died, the locals stripped it to the bone and took the meat for their own purposes. As the essay ends, the narrator wonders to himself if anyone will ever understand that he only made the decision to shoot the elephant to avoid looking like a fool in front of the people he is responsible for policing. Shooting an Elephant Essay Courage is being able to drown out the voices of others and stay true to one’s own morals.

In the memoir Shooting An Elephant, George Orwell describes his time as a British Colonial police officer in Burma. Shooting an Elephant Summary SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides that feature detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, quotes, and essay topics.

Shooting an Elephant Summary Buy Study Guide " Shooting an Elephant " by George Orwell is a narrative essay about Orwell's time as a police officer for the British Raj in colonial Burma. Mar 16,  · Reading George Orwell’s Shooting an Elephant, i saw it from a different point of view, i wouldnt of had killed the elephant, it wasn’t causing any trouble.

Being under pressure doesnt help at all, you cant think straight, its true. Immediately download the Shooting an Elephant summary, chapter-by-chapter analysis, book notes, essays, quotes, character descriptions, lesson plans, and more - everything you need for studying or teaching Shooting an Elephant.

George Orwell uses narration in “Shooting an Elephant” to support his thesis that imperialism is an immoral relationship of power because it compels the oppressor to act immorally to keep up appearances that he is right, .

Shooting an Elephant